So you’re a casual blackjack player on vacation, and you have no desire to learn how to count cards. The math, oh the math!

Whoa! Let me assure you that it’s easier than you think, and that I’ll be your partner.

First, many of us play blackjack. You don’t have to be an MIT graduate student to learn how to count cards, and you certainly do not have to be a blackjack professional benefiting from counting cards.

Look at your end of year win-loss statement if you play blackjack at a casino. Next time you go to a casino, go to the host and ask for your win-loss if you don’t have it or have never obtained it. After you look at it, think to yourself if you would like to shrink that loss by half or more? That’s money right in your pocket. And you might even come out ahead and show a profit.

Let me draw another picture. You know all those times where you doubled down and got a 4 to 5? Or all those times the dealer had a 16 and drew a…4 or 5? Well, what if by having just a little bit of knowledge, you were able to draw more 10s on your double downs, and the dealer draw more 10s on his 16 WHEN IT MATTERED?

The dealer has 16. He is much more likely to bust if there is a proportionately heavier concentration of 10 value cards in the deck.

And what if I told you that you already know how to count cards? You just haven’t trained your brain how to count cards.

YOU ALREADY KNOW HOW TO COUNT CARDS!

You already know how to count cards if you know the answer to the following three math questions:

1+1 = ?

-4+1 = ?

6÷2 = ?

If you don’t know, then yeah, you’re in trouble and you can stop reading. But I’m certain that you know the answers to those three math problems.

Counting cards is nothing more than 1 + 1 or 1 – 1. That’s all it is. Your brain isn’t trained to learn how to count 1 + 1 and 1 – 1 continually.

Remember when you were a little kid and your dad taught you to ride a bike for the first time? Or maybe you taught your kids how to ride a bike. At first, it seemed difficult. You had to concentrate. But after a while, you didn’t think about it. Now as an adult, you get on your bike and just…go without thinking.

Or remember when you learned how to drive? Now, you just get in the car…and just drive.

You get my point.

Eventually, you will be able to count and not even think much about it. It’ll be so second nature to you that you won’t even think about it. You’ll just do it naturally.

YOU’RE STILL NOT CONVINCED

You have 2+8, which in this case, according to basic strategy, you should double down. You are much more likely to receive a 10 is the deck is rich in 10s, versus the deck being poor in 10s.

That’s okay. Eventually, you will be. Next time you’re in a casino and you get a low card on a double down or the dealer draws a 3, 4, or 5 on his 16, eventually you’ll be convinced.

Or you get an ace…and then you get a 5.

That’s not bad luck. That’s because you played with a deck where the 1os have been severely depleted. Eventually, if you realize why those things are happening, you’ll stop blaming bad luck and blame yourself.

You can take control by doing simple things. If the deck is depleted of 10s, maybe you should take a bathroom break right now! Or maybe tell the dealer you are not going to play the next hand because you’re ordering a very detailed cocktail. Anything is better than making a bet and getting it yanked because the dealer drew a nasty 5 on his 16. Take charge of your own destiny.

You’ll eventually want to learn, and I’ll be here to teach you.

Bam! There’s the 10!

CARD COUNTING IS FOR THE AVERAGE VACATION GAMBLER

One of the most common comments I receive when I bring up the card counting issue is that you will be chased from casino to casino, or that you will be banned.

NOT TRUE!

There are several types of gamblers, one of which is the hardcore advantage player who is looking to make a living off of counting cards. That’s not the point of my lessons. I am going to teach you how to count cards as a vacation gambler.

You won’t be making huge bets when the deck favors you, but you will double or triple your bet. You’ll also sit out when the deck is poor in 10s. That way, you avoid the situations where you double down with a bad deck and you are more likely to avoid situations where the dealers draws a 4 or 5 to his 16. You won’t be playing cat and mouse with the casino. Rather, you are going to use the knowledge of the remaining cards to sit out the rest of the shoe. Enjoy your drink, look around. Just don’t play when the deck doesn’t favor you. And then, when the deck favors you, double up your bet, maybe triple up your bet.

In all my years of counting cards at blackjack, I have never been backed off a blackjack table playing this way. You aren’t going to get rich playing this way, but in the long run, you also aren’t going to be losing to the casino. You will take your gambling vacations for free. Casinos need you to lose money to them. Let the other players lose their money. You will gamble for free.

Let me teach you how.

HOW I’LL TRAIN YOU

Notice that I used the word, ‘train’. That’s because, as I said, you already know how to count cards. Now I’m just going to train your brain.

AFTER I train your brain, then I’ll tell you in detail how to use the training to actually turn the game of blackjack to your advantage. I’ve trained people before in real life, and in my experience, it’s best to limit the initial information, otherwise, the initial information can be overwhelming.

Of course, just so that you have a clue, so as to motivate you to keep on going, I’ll simply and quickly tell you why we are going to do what we are going to do.

I am producing a series of videos where I teach students how to count cards. It’s just for my Youtube channel and for my RoadGambler.com website.

Of course, if you would like to help me with the cost of the videos and website, sign up with my recommended online casinos (whom I have vetted and are well-known brands), make a small deposit, and play with them for a little bit. It’ll help me tremendously, as I employ a full-time staff and incur expenses to make the RoadGambler project a reality.

THE ACTUAL TRAINING

I am going to train your brain by having you follow along with me as we count the cards…

+1

+1

+1

-1

0

-1

0

+1

That’s all it is! You’re just adding and subtracting 1.

Just like having a gym partner, it’ll be easier and the time will go faster if you have a partner. I will be your partner.

Let’s take this trip together and let’s beat the casinos!

Look for these series of videos in early February. With enough interest, I will be doing these videos regularly.

Stay tuned to this website. I am working on the videos, and they’ll be available in the future.

IN CLOSING…

Double down on 4+6, versus dealer’s 2.

It’s true that counting cards does not guarantee that you will win in the short run, however, in the long run, if you count and play properly, you will win. Casinos lose on occasion, but in the long term, they usually win. That’s not because they’re lucky; rather, it’s because they have the edge on their side.

You have to know what you are doing, and you have to learn properly.  I will teach you so that you have the edge on your side.

Remember, you can make your own luck.

This is the result you want more often, and you can ensure that in the long run, when you are betting larger amounts, this is what will happen more often.

 

 

Posted in: Blackjack, Casino, Gambling

0 thoughts on “You Should Know How to Count Cards (It’s EASY and I’ll Teach You)

    • RoadGambler says:

      The initial test on the series did not go too well. I will be providing an update soon, now that you asked.

      The TL;lDR version is that it’s hard to get people to practice, no matter how easy.

  • I’d be interested in the project, even if left to practice on my own. I appreciate any advantage I can get to keep as much money as possible. I don’t need to make a living, but would like to enjoy the game with as little cost as necessary. Thanks for the blog and videos!

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