I love Atlantic City. It’s one of my favorite gambling destinations.

Here are my thoughts on Atlantic City.

ATLANTIC CITY HAS BETTER GAMBLING DEALS THAN MOST OF THE COUNTRY

Casinos are a business, and like any business, each casino has an obligation to their owners or shareholders to maximize profits. Some casinos maximize profits by lowering their limits and attracting a massive amount of low rollers, while some go with the more selective route and keep their limits higher, hoping to attract a more well-heeled crowd.

Atlantic City seems to have found a medium in which their casinos will not gouge you with across the board $15 and $25 limit tables. It’s easy to find a $10 table in Atlantic City, and at Wild Wild West, you can also find $5 tables, even on the weekends.

Even at the ‘new’ casinos like Hard Rock and Ocean (notice I put ‘new’ in quotations), you can find $10 limits.

That’s a gambling deal that means you can gamble for cheap with a relatively small bankroll.

Also, 6-5 blackjack, while present, is not the primary offering, unlike at some Las Vegas Casinos.

On the topic of better gambling deals…

ATLANTIC CITY HAS BETTER ROULETTE THAN MOST OF THE COUNTRY

Atlantic City is the only major destination I can think of that allows La Partage all on their double zero roulette games.

La Partage offers a major deal to roulette players. If you don’t know about La Partgage, you should read this:

Roulette: La Partage and En Prison, Explained

ATLANTIC CITY WILL NEVER BE A NATIONAL OR GLOBAL DESTINATION, AND THAT’S NOT A BAD THING

Atlantic City has a minor airport that only services a few airlines. If you want to fly into Atlantic City, the best you can do – and what most people do – is fly into Philadelphia and then take the AC Expressway to Atlantic City. It’s about a 40-50 minute drive, depending on traffic.

To get to Atlantic City, first fly into Philadelphia, the first capital of the country.

Can you imagine if Las Vegas McCarran International Airport was a 40-minute drive from Las Vegas?

AC Expressway.
You’re getting close once you start seeing the casino billboards. The good news is that it’s a clear drive, for the most part…
Very slight congestion once you arrive at the edge of Atlantic City.

Therein is the problem with Atlantic City growth. It can’t grow because there isn’t a major airport into Atlantic City, but there isn’t a major airport because Atlantic City can’t grow. It’s a chicken versus egg problem. It’s not cheap to build an airport, and there are no guarantees that airlines would create new routes to Atlantic City because there’s no guarantee that people would want to go to Atlantic City…and people don’t want to make the extra effort to go to Atlantic City because then they have to drive 40 minutes after they land. Round and round.

I’m kind of ok with Atlantic City not being a national destination. The country already has a national gambling destination in the form of Las Vegas. The last thing we need in Atlantic City is $25 tables, as a standard, and 10x the amount of traffic.

Let’s keep Atlantic City the way it is.

THE PEOPLE OF ATLANTIC CITY ARE AWESOME, ONCE YOU UNDERSTAND (AND YOU NEED TO UNDERSTAND OR ELSE YOU’LL BE OFFENDED)

When I first lived in New Jersey, it took me a while to get used to the mannerisms and New Jersey speech. I’m originally from the Bible Belt states, where everyone is very polite and friendly. The first time I was ever told, ‘Get the f*ck outta here’, I thought I was being challenged to a fight.

That’s just the way we talk in New Jersey, and it’s something of a term of endearment. Not everyone is going to say exactly that, but speech in New Jersey tends to be more brusque than the rest of the country. People are just direct. It’s not an insult and it’s not meant to be taken personally. It’s just the way we speak in New Jersey.

Sure, you’re not gonna get Aloha and Mahalo, but then again, a New Jersey diner isn’t meant to be like a Hawaiian Luau. A New Jersey diner, with the way the waitress interacts late at night when her shift is almost over, is just different and unique.  It’s genuine and real. It’s also part of the tapestry of the country, and it’s kinda cool.

Chill out and take a ride in one of the pushcarts that are all over the Atlantic City boardwalk.

CONCLUSION

New Jersey is never going to compete with Las Vegas, and it shouldn’t compete with Las Vegas. Whenever I see the gambling revenue for Atlantic City, it always makes me uneasy because then people start comparing Atlantic City to Las Vegas.

If you’ve never been to Atlantic City, you need to go at least once in your lifetime. The beach isn’t white sand, and the lights aren’t as bright as Las Vegas. But Atlantic City has character, charm, and a taste of genuine America. At least go see it once. Or you can go to see the fake Statue of Liberty, fake New York City, fake Parisian cocktail waitresses, fake Venetian gondolas, fake…oh you get it.

Atlantic City casinos can be just as nice as their Las Vegas cousins…
They just don’t have the gaudy flashing neon lights on the outside.

Go experience a bit of real old school America for cryin’ out loud.

 

 

Posted in: Casino, Gambling

0 thoughts on “RoadGambler Thoughts on Atlantic City as a Gambling Destination

  • Thanks for this article it helps me decide a trip,… 8 hr drive but if I can find tables that meet my bank roll sounds good to me.

  • Lawrence Roth says:

    I took the Amtrak from Philly twice into AC back in the 80s. Rather than take a cab, I decided to make the 1/2 mile walk to the casino. I remember the neighborhood being pretty sketchy.

    • Just think about how it is now… Maybe really sketchy .. we did a train trip from Ohio to Chicago figured it would be something fun and change of pace
      O boy… Never again..nasty train dirty, toilet was just unbelievable stench and lucky me I was seated almost next to the door.

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